MCITP Family Support Network

A community of families dedicated to early intervention in Montgomery County, MD

Ask Dr. Villa, Health Blog #9: My Child with Autism


We are lucky to have Dr. Marcella Villa as our Pediatric Blogger. Dr. Villa is a Pediatric Resident at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. She welcomes your questions and comments.
 

Ask Dr. Villa, Blog #9: My Child with Autism

Most infants and young children are very social beings who need and want contact with others to thrive and grow. They smile, cuddle, laugh, and become very excited with games such as "peek-a-boo" or hide-and-seek.

From time to time, however, a child does not interact in this way. A child may seem to be in his/her own world; focused on repetitive routines, odd and peculiar behaviors, trouble communicating, and a lack of social awareness or interest in others. These are characteristics found in autism, a developmental disorder.
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by abnormalities or impairments in social interaction, communication, and behavior.

Symptoms of autism are usually identified by the time a child is 30 months old (2 ½ y.o) but may present earlier and in cases where the child has high functioning autism – it may not be obvious to parents or teachers until four to six years of age. Approximately 65% of patients with autism present with lack of acquisition of communication skills during the first two years of life; Approximately 25 – 65% of children with ASD achieve early language milestones, but have regression of language, communication, and/or social skills between 15 to 24 months of age. The regression of skills can be gradual or sudden, and may occur in the context of preexisting developmental delays or atypical development. Regression of skills is an important characteristic of ASD; sometimes attributing this regression to stressors, such as the birth of a new sibling or moving to a new home, may delay the diagnosis of ASD.

In the earlier ages it often discovered when parents express concern that their child may be deaf, is not talking, resists cuddling, and avoids interacting with others.

Early signs and symptoms that may indicate a child may need further evaluation for autism include:
• 6 months old: no smiling
• 9 months old: no back and forth sharing of sounds, smiles or facial expressions
• 12 months old: no babbling, pointing, reaching or waving
• 16 months old: no single words
• 24 months old: no two word phrases
• Regression in development - any loss of speech, babbling or social skills

At preschool age a child with "classic" autism is generally withdrawn, aloof, and does not pay attention or respond to other people. They may not make eye contact. They may engage in odd or ritualistic behaviors like rocking, hand flapping, or an obsessive need to maintain order. Children with autism may fail to develop peer relationships appropriate to their developmental level. Younger children may have little or no interest in developing friendships. They may prefer playing alone than playing games involve others. At times they may use others in activities only as tools or "mechanical" aids. For example, they use the hand of a parent to obtain a desired object without making eye contact.
The impairment in reciprocal social interaction may be profound and sustained. Younger children may be unaware of other children including siblings. They may lack empathy for another's emotional perspective; for example, they may be unable to sense that another is in pain.

The severity of autism varies widely, from mild to severe. A majority of children with autism do not speak at all and those who do speak tend to speak in rhyme, have echolalia. Echolalia refers to repeating a person's words like an echo. Children may not respond to the calling of their names; concerns regarding hearing impairment may be the presenting complaint. Children with autism may be unable to understand simple questions or directions. They do not engage in simple imitation games of infancy and early childhood.

Some children are bright and do well in school but may have problems with school adjustment. They may be able to live independently when they grow up. Other children with autism function at a much lower level. Mental retardation is commonly associated with autism. Verbal skills are usually weaker than nonverbal skills. Performance on tasks that require rote, mechanical, visuospatial, or perceptual processes is usually better than on tasks that require higher-order conceptual processes, reasoning, interpretation, integration, or abstraction.

Occasionally, a child with autism may display an extraordinary talent in art, music, or another specific area. Some individuals have special skills, referred to at times as "savant" skills, in memory, mathematics, music, art, or puzzles, despite profound deficiencies in other domains. Other special skills include calendar calculation and hyperlexia, spontaneous and early mastery of single-word reading. The reading is usually concrete, with little comprehension or understanding of the purpose of reading.

The cause of autism remains unknown. Theories indicate a problem with the function or structure of the central nervous system. Parents do not cause autism and there is no real evidence indicating that the contents of vaccines cause autism.

Children with autism need a comprehensive evaluation and specialized behavioral and educational programs. Child and adolescent psychiatrists are trained to diagnose autism, and to help families design and implement an appropriate treatment plan. They can also help families cope with the stress associated with having a child with autism. There is no cure for autism but appropriate specialized treatment provided early in life can have a positive impact on the child's development.

Where to Get an Autism Diagnosis

Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
The Autism & Communications Disorders Clinic
Georgetown University Hospital
3800 Reservoir Road, NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-444-0433
http://gucchd.georgetown.edu 

Children's National Medical Center – Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders
15245 Shady Grove Road, Suite 350 South Bldg
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: 301-765-5430
Fax: 301-765-5497
www.childrensnational.org
CNMC CASD Autism Spectrum Disorders: Selected Reading and Resources

Kennedy Krieger Institute
3901 Greenspring Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21211
Phone: 443-923-7632
Fax: 443-923-7638
www.kennedykrieger.org

 

Useful Resources:

Autism Society Maryland:
http://www.autism-society.org/get-involved/state-resources/maryland...

 

The Early Childhood Gateway – School Improvement in Maryland http://mdk12.org/instruction/specialed/knowspecial_education_d.html

 

Useful Links:
http://aacap.org/cs/Autism.ResourceCenter

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/image?imageKey=PEDS%2F19464&to...

 

References:
American Psychiatric Association. Pervasive Developmental Disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR®)., American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC p.70.
Rapin I. Autism. N Engl J Med 1997; 337:97.

 

Landa R, Garrett-Mayer E. Development in infants with autism spectrum disorders: a prospective study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2006; 47:629.

 

Chawarska K, Klin A, Paul R, Volkmar F. Autism spectrum disorder in the second year: stability and change in syndrome expression. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2007; 48:128.

 

Landa RJ, Holman KC, Garrett-Mayer E. Social and communication development in toddlers with early and later diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2007; 64:853.


 

Pregúntele a la Dra. Villa: Mi niño con autismo

 

 

La mayoría de los niños son seres muy sociales que necesitan y quieren contacto con otros; ellos crecen y desarrollan a raíz de estas interacciones.  Sonríen, abrazan, ríen, y se emocionan con los juegos como " peekaboo" o escondite.
 

De vez en cuando, un niño no se comporta de esta manera. Un niño puede aparentar estar en su propio mundo; centrado en rutinas, comportamientos impares y peculiares, dificultad al comunicar, y una carencia del interés en otros.  Éstas son características encontradas en un trastorno autista, un desorden de desarrollo.
 

Trastornos del Espectro Autista (TEA) son un grupo de desordenes del neuro desarrollo caracterizados por anormalidades o debilitaciones en la interacción social, comunicación, y comportamiento. Los síntomas de un trastorno autista se identifican generalmente antes de que el niño cumpla 30 meses (2 años y medio) pero puede presentar antes y en el caso de un niño con autismo de alto funcionamiento, puede no ser obvio a los padres o a los profesores hasta que el niño cumpla cuatro a seis años de edad.
 

Aproximadamente 65% de pacientes con un trastorno autista presentan con la carencia de la adquisición de las capacidades de comunicación durante los primeros dos años de vida; Aproximadamente 25 a 65% de niños con un trastorno autista  alcanzan los acontecimientos fundamentales del desarrollo del lenguaje, pero tienen retrazo del lenguaje, de la comunicación, y/o de habilidades sociales entre 15 a 24 meses de la edad. El retrazo de habilidades puede ser gradual o repentina, y puede ocurrir en el contexto de retardos de desarrollo preexistentes o del desarrollo anormal. El retrazo de habilidades es una característica importante de un trastorno autista.  A veces se le atribuye este retrazo a factores de ansiedad, tales como el nacimiento de un nuevo hermano o mudanza a un nuevo hogar y esto puede retrasar la diagnosis de un trastorno autista.
 

En las edades tempranas a menudo se descubre el autismo cuando los padres expresan preocupación que su niño puede ser sordo, no está hablando, no se deja abrazar, y evita interactuar con otros. Las señales y los síntomas tempranos que pueden indicar que el niño necesita evaluación adicional para un trastorno autista  incluyen:

 

• 6 meses: no sonríe espontáneamente

 

• 9 meses: no comparte sonrisas ni expresiones faciales con otros. 

 

• 12 meses: no señala objetos de su interés, no reacciona cuando dicen su nombre

 

• 16 meses: no tiene palabras, no juega con situaciones imaginarias, evita el contacto visual y juega solo
 

• 24 meses: no forma frases de dos palabras - tiene dificultad para expresar sentimientos; se irrita fácil por cambios mínimos.  El niño afectado por estos trastornos suele ser irritable y los cambios mínimos cambian rápidamente su humor – esto puede suceder a cualquier edad.
 

• Retrasos en el desarrollo - cualquier pérdida de lenguaje, de habla o de habilidades sociales

 

 

En la edad preescolar un niño con un trastorno autista clásico generalmente se retira, es reservado, y no presta atención ni responde a la otra gente, no hace contacto visual. Otros rasgos muy típicos de los trastornos del espectro autista son cuando el niño mece su cuerpo como autómata, realiza un movimiento de aleteo con sus manos, gira en círculos, o demuestra una necesidad obsesiva para mantener orden.

 

El niño con un trastorno autista no puede desarrollar relaciones apropiadas para su edad; puede tener poco interés en formar amistades; puede preferir jugar a solas que jugar con otros. Ocasionalmente utiliza a otros en actividades solamente como herramientas. Por ejemplo, utiliza la mano de un padre para obtener un objeto deseado sin intención de tener interacción social y sin hacer contacto visual.

 

La debilitación en la interacción social recíproca puede ser profunda.  El niño ser inconsciente de otros niños incluyendo hermanos. El niño con un trastorno autista tiene dificultad para comprender los sentimientos ajenos y para expresar los propios.  A veces el niño reacciona de forma extraña.  Por ejemplo, gritar o angustiarse exageradamente frente a un ruido, o reírse a gritos en momentos inoportunos. También temerle a cosas inofensivas pero no tener conciencia de peligros reales. Los niños con trastornos autistas graves pueden llegar a dañarse a sí mismos. Se irritan si se los saca de la rutina diaria.

 

En muchos casos, los niños desarrollan bien hasta los 24 meses, para luego dejar de adquirir destrezas como la capacidad de comunicarse.  La severidad de un trastorno autista varía extensamente, de leve a severo. La mayoría de niños con autismo no hablan y los que hablan tienden a hablar en rima, o repiten siempre la misma palabra.  La repetición de palabras es un rasgo que cruza todos los trastornos autistas, habitualmente es la palabra "mamá" o "papá", la que dicen una y otra vez.  

 

El niño no responde cuando se le llama su nombre, no es capaz de entender preguntas o direcciones simples. No participa en juegos de imitación simples de la infancia y de la niñez temprana. Algunos niños son brillantes y les va bien en escuela pero pueden tener problemas con el ajuste al aspecto social de la escuela.  Otros niños con autismo funcionan en un nivel inferior. El retraso mental se asocia comúnmente a autismo. Las habilidades verbales son generalmente más débiles que habilidades no verbales.  Las tareas que requieren memoria por lo general suelen ser mas fácil que las tareas que requieren procesos, razonamiento, interpretación, integración, o la abstracción.

 

De vez en cuando, un niño con autismo puede exhibir un talento extraordinario en arte, música, u otra área específica. Algunos individuos tienen habilidades especiales, designadas habilidades" savantes" a pesar de deficiencias profundas en otros dominios. Otras habilidades especiales incluyen el cálculo del calendario y la maestría de la lectura, espontánea y temprana.  La lectura es generalmente concreta, con poca comprensión de la lectura.
 

La causa sigue siendo desconocida. Las teorías indican un problema con la función o la estructura del sistema nervioso central. Los padres no causan autismo y no hay evidencia verdadera que indica que el contenido de vacunas causa autismo.
 

Los niños con autismo necesitan una evaluación comprensiva y programas de comportamiento y educativos especializados. Los siquiatras del niños y de adolescentes son entrenados en diagnosticar autismo, y para ayudar a las familias a diseñar y a ejecutar un plan apropiado de tratamiento.  Ayudan a establecer intervención temprana para el diagnóstico y el rápido tratamiento.  Pueden también ayudar a las familias a enfrentar a la tensión asociada a tener un niño a autismo. No hay cura para los trastornos del espectro autista pero tratamiento especializado, apropiado, y temprano puede tener un impacto positivo en el desarrollo del niño. 

 

Enlaces Útiles: 

 

http://salud.univision.com/es/%C3%A1lbum-de-fotos/las-12-se%C3%B1al...

 

http://aacap.org/cs/Autism.ResourceCenter
 

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/image?imageKey=PEDS%2F19464&to...

 


Donde pueden diagnosticar un trastorno de espectro autista?

 

Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
The Autism & Communications Disorders Clinic

Georgetown University Hospital

3800 Reservoir Road, NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-444-0433
http://gucchd.georgetown.edu

 

Children's National Medical Center – Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders
15245 Shady Grove Road, Suite 350 South Bldg
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: 301-765-5430
Fax: 301-765-5497
www.childrensnational.org


CNMC CASD Autism Spectrum Disorders: Selected Reading and Resources
 

 

 

Kennedy Krieger Institute
3901 Greenspring Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21211
Phone: 443-923-7632 

www.kennedykrieger.org

 

  

Useful Resources: 

Autism Society Maryland:
http://www.autism-society.org/get-involved/state-resources/maryland...


The Early Childhood Gateway – School Improvement in Maryland http://mdk12.org/instruction/specialed/knowspecial_education_d.html

 

References: 

 

American Psychiatric Association. Pervasive Developmental Disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR®)., American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC p.70.

 

Rapin I. Autism. N Engl J Med 1997; 337:97.
 

Landa R, Garrett-Mayer E. Development in infants with autism spectrum disorders: a prospective study. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2006; 47:629.

 

Chawarska K, Klin A, Paul R, Volkmar F. Autism spectrum disorder in the second year: stability and change in syndrome expression. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2007; 48:128.

 

Landa RJ, Holman KC, Garrett-Mayer E. Social and communication development in toddlers with early and later diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2007; 64:853.

 

 


Views: 215

Comment

You need to be a member of MCITP Family Support Network to add comments!

Join MCITP Family Support Network

© 2020   Created by Cristina Benitez.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service